Category Archives: Podcast: ERRR Podcast

ERRR #006. Jennifer Stephenson and Instructional Decision Making of Teacher Education Students

Listen to all past episodes of the ERRR podcast here.

In this episode we spoke to Jennifer Stephenson.

Jennifer is an honorary research fellow and associate professor at Macquarie University. She has a background in teaching students with severe disabilities and over 20 years experience in preparing special educators. Her research interests include the use of effective and ineffective practices in special education, augmentative and alterative communication for students with severe disabilities, students with autism spectrum disorder, challenging behaviour, and the use of iPads with children with disability. She has published over 80 refereed journal articles and book chapters.

Jennifer’s paper that we read was entitled ‘Factors in Instructional Decision-Making, Ratings of Evidence and Intended Instructional Practices of Australian Final Year Teacher Education Students’. This article details Jennifer’s survey with 290 pre-service teachers in their final year of teacher training. The survey aimed to discover how well these PSTs were able to distinguish between evidence based and non-evidence based instructional practices, and to determine which sources of information, and which experiences most influenced the practices that these PSTs planned to adopt in the classroom. This paper prompted a really interesting discussion, and even a little instructional practices quiz that was held for the attendees of the ERRR.

Jennifer’s nominated article was:  Factors in Instructional Decision-Making, Ratings of Evidence and Intended Instructional Practices of Australian Final Year Teacher Education Students. This article details Jennifer’s survey with 290 pre-service teachers in their final year of teacher training. The survey had two broad goals: 1. To discover how well these PSTs were able to distinguish between evidence based and non-evidence based instructional practices (From learning styles instruction to direct instruction), 2. To determine which sources of information, and which experiences most influenced the practices that these PSTs planned to adopt in the classroom (from experiences during placement to journal articles). This article will no doubt lead prompt a lively discussion on the role of evidence-based practices in the classroom, as well as various strengths and weaknesses of current teacher training programs throughout Australia.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Links mentioned during the interview

Links Mentioned in the Intro (Thanks to Max Lenoy for providing links)

ERRR #005. Pamela Snow, Phonics + How can we get the real story from students?

Listen to all past episodes of the ERRR podcast here.

In this episode of the Education Research Reading Room we were lucky enough to have as our guest Professor Pamela Snow.

Pamela is a registered psychologist, having qualified originally in speech pathology. Her research has been funded by nationally competitive schemes such as the ARC Discovery Program, ARC Linkage Program, and the Criminology Research Council, and spans various aspects of risk in childhood and adolescence, in particular:

-the oral language skills of high-risk young people (youth offenders and those in the state care system), and the role of oral language competence as an academic and mental health protective factor in childhood and adolescence;
-applying evidence in the language-to-literacy transition in the early years of school;
-linguistic aspects of investigative interviewing with children / adolescents as witnesses, suspects, victims in criminal investigations;

Pamela has taught a wide range of undergraduate health professionals, and also has experience in postgraduate teacher education. She has research links with the education, welfare and justice sectors, and her research has been published in a wide range of international journals. She is frequently called upon to address education, health, welfare, and forensic audiences.

Pamela’s Twitter handle is @PamelaSnow2 and her blog The Snow Report can be found at http://pamelasnow.blogspot.com.au/

This month we have two articles from Pamela. Guidelines for teachers to elicit detailed and accurate narrative accounts from children and The way we teach most children to read sets them up to fail. The first article is a truly gripping piece on how to talk to students in a way that makes them feel comfortable and willing to share what’s happening at home (when appropriate) or what happened following an incident at school. The second article is a concise and valuable overview of the current landscape of effective literacy instruction.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Links from the intro/outro.

Links from the body of the interview.

ERRR #004. Paul Weldon, Teacher Supply and Demand, and Out of Field Teaching

Listen to all past episodes of the ERRR podcast here.


Paul Weldon  is a Senior Research Fellow with the Australian Council for Educational Research. He works on multiple different educational research programs and is commonly involved in program evaluation and the design, delivery and analysis of surveys. Through his work on the Staff in Australia’s Schools (SiAS) surveys in 2010 and 2013, Paul developed a particular interest in the teacher workforce. He was the lead writer of the most recent Victorian Teacher Supply and Demand Report, and led the recent AEU Victoria workload survey.

In this episode we talk to Paul about his two papers, The Teacher workforce in Australia: Supply, demand and data issues and Out-of-field teaching in Australian secondary schools. This episode’s discussion includes an in-depth examination of the ’30% of teachers leave with in the first 3 years and 50% within the first 5’ that’s often quoted in relation to retention of early career teachers, the landscape of teacher supply and demand out to 2020, as well as what the distribution of out of field teaching in Australia says about how we value our out of field teachers.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

 

Australian Policy Online. ‘a research database and alert service providing free access to full text research reports and papers, statistics and other resources essential for public policy development and implementation in Australia, New Zealand and beyond.’. 

ERRR #003. Tom Bennett and The school Research Lead

Listen to all past episodes of the ERRR podcast here.


Tom Bennett is the founder of researchED, a grass-roots organisation that seeks to raise research literacy in education. Since 2013 researchED has visited three continents and six countries, attracting thousands of followers. In 2015 he became the UK government’s school ‘Behaviour Czar’, advising on behaviour policy. He has written four books about teacher training, and in 2015 he was long listed as one of the world’s top teachers in the GEMS Global Teacher Prize. In the same year he made the Huffington Post’s ‘Top Ten Global Bloggers’ list. His online resources have been viewed over 1,200,000 times.

In this episode we talk to Tom about his paper ‘The Research Lead’, which advocates for schools to allot time to a ‘research lead’ in order for that individual to further explore education research and how that ed research can enrich their school’s learning program.

As well as our guest we were joined in the ERRR this episode by Ed, Beth, Helen, Jen, and Catherine. If you’d like to join us for the next episode of the ERRR you can sign up for free here.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Tom suggests: Log onto ResearchED website, check out their resources, then subscribe to their newsletter (bottom left of this page).

Daniel Willingham’s ‘Why Students Don’t Like School’. I (Ollie) read this book back in 2014 and it fundamentally changed the way I approach learning more then anything I had ever read prior, or anything I’ve read since. The point that was new to me is that ‘Factual knowledge precedes skill’. I wrote about it here.

People that Tom Suggests we follow on Twitter: Andrew Old, Sam Freedman, Daisy Christodoulou, Daniel Willingham.

Dean’s for Impact paper on ‘The Science of Learning’.

Catherine Scott’s ‘People who Like to Talk about Teaching’ Facebook page. 

 

ERRR #002. Stephen Dinham and The Worst of Both worlds

Listen to all past episodes of the ERRR podcast here.

Professor Stephen Dinham has had a long and illustrious career in education, from over a decade in the classroom to Associate Dean of The Melbourne Graduate School of Education. In this paper we talk to Dinham about his paper ‘The Worst of Both Worlds‘, detailing Australia’s tendency to adopt edu policies from the U.S and U.K, even when they don’t work.

As well as our guest we were joined in the ERRR this episode by Jen, Danielle, Andy, Kelvin, Catherine, and Eleanor. If you’d like to join us for the next episode of the ERRR you can sign up for free here.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Peter Goss’ Grattan Institute paper on a new funding model. Summary on The Conversation as well as the original paper.

Catherine Scott’s ‘People who Like to Talk about Teaching’ Facebook page. 

ERRR #001. Jan Owen and The New Basics

Listen to all following episodes of the ERRR podcast here.

I’m very excited to be able to share the first ever episode of the Education Research Reading Room (ERRR) Podcast!

The ERRR Podcast brings together inspiring educators with early career teachers and educators for engaging and informative discussion on key issues in education and education research.

Each episode we contact a prominent figure in the education landscape and ask them ‘If every teacher and educator in the world could spend an hour reading your work, what would you want them to read?’. A group of early career teachers and educators reads this piece then joins with the author to discuss. The subsequent discussion becomes the Education Research Reading Room Podcast (ERRR Podcast).

Jan Owen is CEO of the Foundation for Young Australians. In this very first episode of the ERRR we speak about FYA’s article ‘The New Basics‘, and how the FYA believes that ‘enterprise skills’ are no longer an educational bonus, but a necessity.

As well as Jan we were joined this episode by Michaela, Maddie, Helen, Calum, Anthony, and Beth. If you’d like to join us for the next episode of the ERRR you can sign up for free here.

Links mentioned in the podcast:

Here’s the new FYA report that Calum mentioned: The 7 new job families to help young people navigate the new work order.