TOT035: Critiquing personalised learning, scaffolding multi-step maths Qs, + more Twitter Takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here

This week: Long term effects of school shootings on student performance, Dynamic activity to introduce students to the coordinate plane, Maybe personalised learning isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, Maths bot to support students’ mental calculations, Scaffolding multi-step maths problems, The acquisition/retention paradox:balancing learning and performance (Click here to read full article)

TOT034: Learning from failures, the space beween novice and expert, + more Twitter Takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here

This week: A quick an effective way to tweak your language when leading/Learning from Failures and why we should interview teachers who have quit/Rules for teachers from the late 1800 early 1900’s (quirky!)/Great list of revision strategies for all learners/Encouraging students to create their own analogies can boost transfer/Great padlet list of education blogs and articles ordered by category/A guide to help students build their own retrieval practice questions/Nice little note taking activity to help students reflect/Advanced Knowledge Acquisition: The space between novice and expert (Click here to read full article)

Student science reports 1.0: From scaffolding to assessment

This is a record of the how and why behind my first attempt at supporting students to write high quality prac reports. This post has been prompted by: Ben Rogers’ interesting post on the same topic, the fact that I’ve been meaning to write about this for ages, and the fact that it’s now time to re-design this process for the coming school year, retaining the wheat and discarding the chaff (hence the 1.0 in the title). If you have any suggestions regarding ways to improve or refine the process outlined below, I’d love to hear them via the comments, twitter, or email.

This post is split into a few sections. It starts off talking about how I started trying to use rubrics and felt they weren’t achieving what I wanted them to. It then goes on to how I scaffolded student science report writing using a highly structured example and sentence starters. Then discusses in detail assessment processes, including a peer-marking component. In addition to this, assessment of surface and deep structure are discussed separately. It concludes with my ideas for the coming year, as well as a list of questions that I still have and that I’m trying to answer.

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TOT033: 5 principles all teachers should know, paying students, + more Twitter Takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here


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TOT032: Measuring what matters, Education in Singapore, Gene Glass, + more Twitter takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here


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ERRR #014. Jennifer Gore on Quality Teaching Rounds and Quant vs. Qual Research

Listen to all past episodes of the ERRR podcast here.

 

This month our guest is Professor Jenny Gore. Jenny Gore is a Laureate Professor in the School of Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia, where she was Dean of Education and Head of School at the University of Newcastle for six years (2008–2013). She completed a Master’s degree at the University of British Columbia, Canada (1983), and PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA (1990), and has held executive roles for the Australian Association for Research in Education, the Australian Council of Deans of Education, and the NSW Teacher Education Council. Currently Director of the Teachers and Teaching Research Centre and Co-Editor of the international journal, Teaching and Teacher Education, Jenny has won more than AUD $7 million in research funding including several grants awarded by the Australian Research Council. Her educational and research interests consistently centre on quality and equity, ranging across such topics as teacher socialisation, reform in teacher education, pedagogical reform, teacher development, and student aspirations. Continue Reading

Reflections on 2017 and a 1 SD increase in maths results

Last year, 2017, was my first year teaching Mathematics at the Year 12 level. I taught two classes of Further Mathematics, which is the base level pre-tertiary Yr 12 Mathematics course in the State of Victoria. I blogged sporadically about my approach throughout 2017, but more recently I’ve had a few teachers ask me to summarise exactly what was done in order to pull all of the elements of the instructional approach together.

I’ve wanted to do a summary post like this one for a while, but I wanted to first wait until my students’ results came out so that I could ensure it wasn’t a complete failure. Results have now been out for a while, and we did really well. I won’t share exact results here but will summarise it by saying that they are the best results that the school has had for this subject in the last 5 years, and we moved the average score for this subject from almost 1 SD below the state average in 2016, to above the state average in 2017 (approx. a 1 SD movement). Beating the state average is perhaps what I’m most proud of, given that our school has 64% of our students in the bottom quartile of socioeconomic status (i.e., 0.83 of an SD below the national average, as measured by ICSEA), and 57% from language backgrounds other than English. Continue Reading

TOT031: Fantastic summary of Ed principles, Dan Willingham’s ‘The Reading Mind’, + more Twitter takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here


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TOT030: Engelmann’s ‘Theory of Instruction’, TLAC placemats, + more Twitter takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here

Fantastic guide to Siegfriend Engelmann’s theory of instruction

A key goal for me this year. Creating a ‘culture of error’, via @Doug_Lemov

Why it’s fallacious to think of a brain like a computer, via @DrREpstein

OMG, 2 pager summary of TLAC. Quality! via @Doug_Lemov

A website dedicated to retrieval practice! via @RetrieveLearn

Notes from my reading of Engelmann’s ‘Theory of Instruction

TOT029: 2 podcasts (adaptive education, and the psychology of procrastination) + more Twitter takeaways

Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways is a weekly summary of many of the fascinating and inspiring things that Ollie’s discovered in the world of education. Often in the form of a twitter digest, it can also sometimes include book or conference notes. Find all past Teacher Ollie’s Takeaways here

Toward an adaptive education system. Podcast via @grattaninst